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Computational Photography

Sydney_Harbor_Bridge_Photologic_100720A
[Sydney Harbor Bridge and Opera House, Sydney, Australia - Photologic]
 
 
 

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  • Computational Photography is concerned with overcoming the limitations of traditional photography with computation: in optics, sensors, and geometry; and even in composition, style, and human interfaces. Computational photography refers to digital image capture and processing techniques that use digital computation instead of optical processes. Computational photography can improve the capabilities of a camera, or introduce features that were not possible at all with film based photography, or reduce the cost or size of camera elements. 
  • Marc Levoy, professor of computer science (emeritus) of Stanford University, has defined computational photography as a variety of "computational imaging techniques that enhance or extend the capabilities of digital photography [in which the] output is an ordinary photograph, but one that could not have been taken by a traditional camera."
  • Computational photography (or computational imaging) refers to digital image capture and processing techniques that use digital computation instead of optical processes. Computational photography can improve the capabilities of a camera, or introduce features that were not possible at all with film based photography, or reduce the cost or size of camera elements. The definition of computational photography has evolved to cover a number of subject areas in computer graphics, computer vision, and applied optics. 
  • "Computational photography combines plentiful computing, digital sensors, modern optics, actuators, and smart lights to escape the limitations of traditional film cameras and enables novel imaging applications. Unbounded dynamic range, variable focus, resolution, and depth of field, hints about shape, reflectance, and lighting, and new interactive forms of photos that are partly snapshots and partly videos are just some of the new applications found in Computational Photography. " -- [Ramesh Raskar and Jack Tumblin, MIT]
 
 COMPUTATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY & INTELLIGENT CAMERAS
 
 

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